Tag Archives: self-help

Overcoming the Pitch Wars Rejection

So, Pitch Wars has come and gone. If you don’t know what Pitch Wars is, you can read all about it here!

But, I did not make it as one of the 2019 mentee’s. In fact, I didn’t even get one request!

I was hopeful in the first few weeks that I would get a request. I was confident that I would. Forbidden had gone through multiple revisions, I felt like my opening pages were strong. I worked with my CP to clean and polish my query letter and synopsis, and then…there was nothing.

By the second week of Pitch Wars, I had resigned myself to believing that I was never getting a request.

Despite the hope that maybe – just maybe – I would get a request at the last minute, it never came. Just yesterday, the Pitch Wars mentee’s were announced, and I’m so happy for everyone who got chosen!

But I’m also sad, too. I’m sad that I didn’t even get one request – which is all I really wanted when entering Pitch Wars. I’m sad that I didn’t get any feedback on what wasn’t working for the mentors – was my query letter bad, were my opening pages not good enough, was it just something they didn’t connect with on a personal level?

While I had a feeling I wasn’t getting picked, it still hurts. And now I’m going through the typical grieving process everyone does when they’re faced with rejection. But I’m determined not to let it get me down, and you know why? It’s because Pitch Wars is not the only way to success.

Pitch Wars is not the golden ticket to success. It is not the only way to find an agent, or to get your work critiqued. While waiting to hear back, I heard so many stories from other people about their journey in past Pitch Wars events. Everything from people who didn’t get a request who now have agents or book deals. To people who got their agent but unfortunately had to part with them. Or even people who got multiple requests and still are unagented.

Pitch Wars is not the end-all-be-all in writing.

Everyone’s journey is different. Everyone’s work is different. My work will not connect with every person out there, and that’s okay.

So I’m going to let myself be upset about being rejected. I’m going to allow myself to take a bubble bath, put on a face mask, and try to recharge from all the soul-crushing anxiety that Pitch Wars brought about. I’m going to watch my favorite movies and read my favorite books. I’m going to binge-eat all the chocolate in the pantry.

And when I’m done doing that, I’m going to get back on my feet and begin querying Forbidden to literary agents. Because I’m proud of all the work I’ve put into this book. I’m proud of how much I’ve grown in the last year and a half since starting it.

Being rejected in Pitch Wars does not mean I will never be successful. It does not mean I’m a bad writer. It does not mean I don’t know how to tell a story. It means that this isn’t the path I’m meant to take.

And I’m okay with that.